Poverty Ratio in Asia

Nations around the world are trying to achieve the Millennium Development Goal of halving extreme poverty by 2015. There has been an unprecedented focus on this development priority, so what does it take to cut poverty in half?

If you base your answer on statistics alone, you might be tempted to say that there is enough income in the poorest region of the world – Asia and Pacific – to ensure that no one lives below $1.25 a day today.

Don’t tell Asia’s 1.4 billion poor people that Asia already has enough money if each person were getting as much as those at risk for famine in Africa south of Sahara! In fact, Asia’s total household consumption was over four times as large as African south of Sahara before allowance for inequality.

The $1.25 a day poverty line is very low, and it is important to remember that it does not represent a dignified standard of living. The World Bank’s latest estimates suggest that in order to meet the extreme poverty line of $1.90 a day, households would need to spend at least $3.10 on basic needs such as food, water, shelter, and clothing every day.

Poverty eradication is achievable if we focus on making sure that everyone has access to basic needs like food, water, education and health services – no matter where they live in the world.

In recent years there have been impressive gains in meeting some of the Millennium Development Goals, including halving the number of people who live in extreme poverty. In 1990, more than 40 percent of the world’s population lived on less than $1.25 a day. That number has been reduced to 21 percent in 2010.

Much progress has been made, but meeting the goal of cutting poverty in half by 2015 will require accelerating current rates of reduction – especially in regions where progress has been slowest, such as Sub-Saharan Africa.

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to eradicating poverty, but we do know that investing in people is the key to success. When people have access to education, health care and opportunities for decent work, they are b

In order to eradicate poverty, we need to focus on making sure that everyone has access to basic needs like food, water and health services.

Much progress has been made in recent years, but meeting the goal of cutting poverty in half by 2015 will require accelerating current rates of reduction – especially in regions where progress has been slowest, such as Sub-Saharan Africa.

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to eradicating poverty, but we do know that investing in people is the key to success. When people have access to education, health care and opportunities for decent work, they are better equipped to break the cycle of poverty and build a brighter future for themselves and their families.

Don’t let Asia’s 1.4 billion poor people know that Asia has enough income to ensure that no one lives below $1.25 a day today! If we base our answer on statistics alone, we might be tempted to say that there is enough household income in the poorest region of the world – Asia and Pacific – to ensure that no one lives below $1.25 a day today. In fact, Asia’s total household consumption was over four times as large as African south of Sahara before allowance for inequality. The $1.25 a day poverty line is very low, and it is important to remember that it does not represent a dignified standard of living. The World Bank’s latest estimates suggest that in order to meet

the extreme poverty line of $1.90 a day, households would need to spend at least $3.10 on basic needs such as food, water, shelter, and clothing every day.

Leave a Comment